Sovereign No. 10 Spring 2019 – Coming Soon!

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I am pleased to announce that the files for SOVEREIGN No. 10 SPRING 2019 – have been sent to the printers. Copies will be available from the ROYAL RUSSIA BOOKSHOP in the first week of May.

Our TENTH issue features 7 full-length articles, including 5 FIRST ENGLISH translations of works by Russian historians + 2 additional articles:

1. Nicholas II in the Words of His Contemporaries by Pyotr Multatuli. Translated by William Lee 1st ENGLISH TRANSLATION

2. Nicholas II in the Historical Memory of the Kuban Cossacks by O.V. Matveev. Translated by William Lee 1st ENGLISH TRANSLATION

3. The Wardrobe of the Imperial Family: The History of the Alexander Palace Collection by A.S. Rognatev. Translated by William Lee 1st ENGLISH TRANSLATION

4. Investigator Sokolov: “The Tsar’s Suffering Is Russia’s Suffering” by Y.Y. Vorobyevsky. Translated by Elizabeth S. Yellen 1st ENGLISH TRANSLATION

5. Novonikolayevsk: Born of the People’s Ambition and the Tsar’s Beneficence, Emperor Nicholas II and the City of Novosibirsk: Parallels Between Past and Present by E. Tsybizov. Translated by Elizabeth S. Yellen 1st ENGLISH TRANSLATION

6. Memorandum to Tsar Nicholas II by Pyotr Durnovo

7. My Mission to Clear the Name of Russia’s Last Tsar by Paul Gilbert

8. Nicholas II in Moscow. Photographic Memories of Russia’s Last Emperor

and Sovereign News – featuring news highlights from Russian media resources

Launched in 2015, a total of 12 will be in print by the end of this year, including 3 Special Issues. Click HERE For more information on our journal Sovereign: The Life and Reign of Emperor Nicholas II

© Paul Gilbert. 3 April 2019

Last Tsar. Nicholas II, His Reign & His Russia by S. S. Oldenburg (1939)

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4-volume edition of Last Tsar. Nicholas II, His Reign & His Russia by S. S. Oldenburg (1975) 
Photo © Paul Gilbert

I have been collecting books on Nicholas II now for decades, and there is nothing I enjoy more than a good book hunt! The title which I wanted most to complete my library was the English language 4-volume edition of Last Tsar. Nicholas II, His Reign & His Russia by the noted Russian historian and journalist Sergei Sergeiivich Oldenburg (1888-1940). This title has been out of print for many years now, however, several years back, I was able to track down a set in mint condition, through a Dutch bookseller for €75. This is the only study of Russia’s last emperor and tsar that I would recommend to any serious student of the life and reign of Russia’s last emperor and tsar.

It was the Supreme Monarchist Council[1], a monarchist organization created by Russian émigrés in 1921, who commissioned Oldenburg to write a comprehensive history of the reign of Emperor Nicholas II. The first volume which appeared in Russian, was published in 1939 in Belgrade (Serbia), and the second was not published until a decade later, and posthumously in 1949 in Munich (Germany). The first Russian edition published in Post-Soviet Russia was in 1991. Numerous reprints have been issued since.

The English language edition was published in 1975 by Academic International Press in Gulf Breeze, Florida. Of particular note is the 18-page introduction Searching for the Last Tsar by Associate Professor of History Patrick J. Rollins (now deceased) of Old Dominion University (est. 1930), a public research university in Norfolk, Virginia. As Rollins notes in the study’s preface:

“Oldenburg’s [ Last Tsar. Nicholas II, His Reign & His Russia] is a major document in modern Russian historiography. The final contribution of a Russian nationalist historian, it provides uniquely sensitive insights into the character, personality, and policies of Russia’s last tsar. It has no rival as a political biography of Nicholas II and is without peer as a comprehensive history of his reign.”

His comprehensive study of Nicholas II is apologetic in nature. Oldenburg substantiates that the revolution interrupted the successful progressive economic development of Russia under Nicholas II: “in the twentieth year of the reign of Emperor Nicholas II, Russia had reached a unprecedented level of economic prosperity”.

Oldenburg was able to undertake such a study of Russia’s last tsar, having had access to a unique collection of documents. These included copies of authentic historical acts of the Russian Empire held in the Russian Embassy in Paris on Rue Grenelle. Long before the First World War, duplicates of the originals had been made as a precautionary measure, and sent to the Russian Embassy in Paris for storage. In October 1917, the Provisional Government appointed Vasily Alekseyevich Maklakov (1869-1957), to replace Alexander Izvolsky as Russia’s Ambassador to France. 

When he arrived in Paris, Maklakov learned about the takeover by the Bolsheviks. Regardless, he continued to occupy the splendid mansion of the Russian embassy for seven years, until France found it necessary to recognize the Bolshevik government. Fearing that the Embassy’s archival documents would fall into the hands of the Bolsheviks, Makloakov packed them up, including Oldenburg’s manuscript, the Okhrana archives, among other items and arranged for their transfer to the Stanford University.

Oldenburg’s fundamental historical research on the life and reign of Emperor Nicholas II, is sadly overlooked or simply ignored by Western historians.

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Sergei Sergeiivich Oldenburg was born on 29 [O.S. 17] June 1888, in the town of Malaya Vishera, Russia. His father Sergey Fedorovich Oldenburg (1863-1934), was a famed academician (1900), and Orientalist specializing in Buddhist studies. He served as permanent secretary of the St. Petersburg Academy of Sciences (from 1904), Russian Academy of Sciences (from 1917), USSR Academy of Sciences (1925-1929), and Minister of Public Education (July — September 1917). His mother Alexandra Pavlovna Oldenburg (nee Timofeeva), was a graduate of the Mathematics Department of the Pedagogical Courses. She died in 1891.

He graduated from the law faculty of Moscow University, and later worked as an official in the Ministry of Finance of Russia.

Unlike his father, who adhered to liberal political views, Sergei from a young age adhered to right-wing views, a member the Union of October 17[2].

In 1918 Oldenburg went to the Crimea, where he joined the White movement. In the fall of 1920, he was unable to evacuate with the Russian Army, headed by General Baron P.N. Wrangel, because he was sick with typhoid . Having recovered, with fake documents, he travelled from Crimea to Petrograd, where he met his father, who helped him to emigrate. 

He crossed the border into Finland, settling in Germany and then Paris, France, where he lived in poverty. Sergei Sergeiivich Oldenburg died at the age of 51, in Paris on 28 April 1940.

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Russian language editions of Oldenburg’s study of Nicholas II have been issued since 1991 

NOTES:

[1] The First Monarchical Congress, was held between 29th May to 6th June 1921, in the Bavarian restort town of Reichengal. The international congress of Russian monarchists in Germany, was intended to organize the activities of of monarchists both in emigration and in Russia (now the Soviet Union). 

The congress was attended by 100 delegates from 30 countries, Metropolitan Anthony (Honorary Chairman), Archbishop Eulogius, Archimandrite Sergius, five senators, two army commanders, five members of the State Council, eight members of the State Duma, fourteen generals and many other statesmen. The chairman of the congress was Alexander Nikolaevich Krupensky (1861-1939).

During the Congress, the question of succession was declared untimely, since the possibility of saving the Imperial family was not ruled out. At the congress, the Dowager Empress Maria Feodorovna was recognized as the undisputed authority among Russian monarchists.

[2] The Union of October 17, commonly known as the Octobrist Party, was a political party in late Imperial Russia, firmly committed to a system of constitutional monarchy.  

Founded in late October 1905, from 1906 the party was led by the industrialist Alexander Guchkov (1862-1936) who drew support from centrist-liberal gentry, and businessmen, who shared moderately right-wing, anti-revolutionary views. They were generally allied with the governments of Sergei Witte in 1905-1906 and Pyotr Stolypin in 1906-1911.

With the outbreak of World War I in August 1914, moderate political parties became moribund in Russia. By 1915, the Octobrists all but ceased to exist outside the capital, Petrograd. Several of its prominent members, particularly Guchkov and Mikhail Rodzianko, continued to play a significant role in Russian politics until 1917, when they were instrumental in convincing Nicholas II to abdicate during the February Revolution and in forming the Russian Provisional Government. With the fall of the Romanovs in March, the party became one of the ruling parties in the first Provisional Government.

Some members of the party later participated in the White Movement after the October Revolution and during the Russian Civil War (1918-1920), becoming active in White émigré circles after the Bolshevik victory in 1920. By that time, the October Revolution had given the term “Octobrist” a completely different meaning and connotation in Russian politics.

© Paul Gilbert. 26 March 2019

‘NICHOLAS II. PORTRAITS by Paul Gilbert NOW IN STOCK!

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CLICK ON THE IMAGE ABOVE TO ORDER YOUR COPY!

I am pleased to offer copies of my new book, Nicholas II. Portraits, which explores a century of portraits of Russia’s last emperor and tsar.

The first book of its kind ever published, Nicholas II. Portraits explores a century of portraits of Russia’s last emperor and tsar.

Beautiful colour covers (front and back), 140 pages, and richly illustrated with 175 black and white photographs, (many full-page), with detailed and informative captions.

This unique title features an introduction, as well as numerous short articles, including: Serov’s Unfinished 1900 Portrait of Nicholas II A Nun’s Gift to Russia’s New Tsar. The Fate of a PortraitGalkin’s Ceremonial Portrait of Nicholas II Discovered; and more!

Famous portraits and their respective artists are all represented, including Serov, Repin, Lipgart, Tuxen, Bakmanson, Becker, Bogdanov-Belsky, Kustodiev, among others.

The last section (28 pages) of the book is dedicated to the works of contemporary Russian artists, who have painted outstanding portraits of Nicholas II since the fall of the Soviet Union.

It is interesting to note that my research for this book was primarily from Russian sources, and I discovered portraits which were new, even to me!

Nicholas II. Portraits is the first of a two-volume set. The second volume Nicholas II. Monuments will be published in the summer of 2019.

© Paul Gilbert. 25 March 2019

Tsar Nicholas II by Major-General A. Elchaninov (1913)

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Back in the 1990s, I was fortunate to track down a copy of this rare book. I then issued a new edition, and after several reprints is now out of print. The text of Elchaninov’s biography on Nicholas II, was published in the premiere issue of SOVEREIGN in 2011.

This unprecedented authorized account of Emperor Nicholas II, by Major-General Andrei Georgievich Elchaninov (1868-1918) was released in early 1913, to coincide with the celebration of the 300th anniversary of the Romanov dynasty. It was originally published in excerpts or installments in many major newspapers during and after the tercentenary events.

The Russian edition was issued in 1913, followed by English (titled The Tsar and His People) and French (titled Le rèine de S.M. l’Empereur Nicolas II) editions in 1914. The latter was translated by Princess Paley (nee Olga Pistolkors), the wife of the Grand Duke Paul Alexandrovich, “so that foreigners, and especially the French, had a correct idea of Russia and her tsar, a country that is a friend and ally.”[1]

While many contemporary biographers claim that Nicholas II was not fit to rule Russia, the author of this work claims otherwise, writing from first-hand experience. The first few chapters show Nicholas to be a caring, devoted and loving father and husband while the remaining chapters focus on his relationship with his government, the church, the army, the Russian people and on the policies which he pursued in his first eighteen years as tsar which he firmly believed were steering Russia towards a better future.

According to Richard S. Wortman, “Elchaninov organized his text to permit the broadest possible dissemination in newspapers.”[2] He notes that the book presents “a unique statement of how Nicholas himself understood his office and wished himself to be perceived.”[3]

Elchaninov gathered considerable material for the twelve brief chapters about Nicholas’s personal life based on observations and impressions of “all those, who standing in close proximity to the throne, have honoured me with their confidence . . .”.[4]

Written before the First World War and the Russian Revolution, Elchaninov writes in glowing patriotic language, portraying Nicholas II as an indefatigable “imperial worker” in the service of Russia’s best interests and the “sovereign father” beloved by the Russian people.

Nicholas reviewed and corrected the proofs himself in January 1913. He made changes to the text, and requested the removal of sentences describing the Tsesarevich Alexei’s illness.

The author, was a member of the emperor’s suite, and a professor of military art in the General Staff Academy in St. Petersburg.

According to the memoirs of Tatiana Evsseva Alexina, Времена не выбирают (Time Does Not Choose) in which she writes about the fate of the Russian noble family Elchaninov, her ancestor Major-General Andrei Georgievich Elchaninov was arrested by the Bolsheviks after the Revolution. He was placed on a raft along with other officers of the Imperial army and drowned in the River Neva in 1918.

Now, more than a century after its’ publication, rare copies of the English and French translation of his book on Nicholas II are highly sought after by collectors, selling for large sums in antiquarian book fairs in the United States, Great Britain and Europe.

NOTES:

1. Wortman, Richard S., Scenarios of Power: Myth and Ceremony in Russian Monarchy, Vol. II. Princeton, NJ. Princeton University Press, 2000. pg. 489
2. Ibid, pg. 489
3. Ibid, pg. 490
4. Ibid, pg. 490

© Paul Gilbert. 19 March 2019

UPDATE: ‘Nicholas II. Portraits & Monuments’ by Paul Gilbert

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Portrait of Nicholas II in his study in the Grand Kremlin Palace, Moscow. Artist: N.F. Yash

I am pleased to announce that my forthcoming book Nicholas II. Portraits & Monuments, will now be published in two separate volumes during the next few months.

This title was originally planned to be one volume, however, the book has since doubled in size, thanks to all the additional information and photographs, which I have amassed primarily from Russian sources.

The first volume Nicholas II. Portraits features beautiful colour covers, 140 pages, numerous articles, and richly illustrated with 175 black and white photographs.

My book features an introduction, as well as a series of articles on portraits and their respective artists, including Serov, Repin, Lipgart, Bakmanson, Ryzhenko, as well as lost portraits found and restored during the post-Soviet years, and much more.

Nicholas II. Portraits went to the printers in February, and will be available from the Royal Russia Bookshop in March 2019. 

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Russia’s first monument to Nicholas II, Tsarskoye Selo. 

The second volume Nicholas II. Monuments will also feature beautiful colour covers, 150 pages, numerous articles, and richly illustrated with more than 150 black and white photographs.

This title will feature an introduction, as well as a series of articles on the destruction of Romanov monuments during and after the 1917 Revolution, and the plethora of monuments, statues, busts and memorial plaques established during the post-Soviet years, and much more. More details on this title will be made available at a later date.

Nicholas II. Monuments is scheduled for publication in June 2019. 

Please note that the publication of books on Nicholas II, is part of my campaign to publish new works, researched primarily from Russian sources, which will provide new facts and information on the life and reign of Russia’s last emperor and tsar, and also to defend the honour of the Tsar-Martyr Nicholas II from the injustices, prejudices and misunderstandings which still surround him more than a century after his death. Thank you to those of you who support my publishing projects.

© Paul Gilbert. 11 February 2019

 

2 NEW Issues of Sovereign in the Works

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I am pleased to announce that 2 NEW issues of Sovereign will be published over the next 3 months.

SOVEREIGN No. 10 SPRING 2019 – AVAILABLE MAY 2019

Our TENTH issue features 7 full-length articles, including 5 FIRST ENGLISH translations of works by Russian historians + 2 additional articles:

1. Nicholas II in the Words of His Contemporaries by Pyotr Multatuli. Translated by William Lee

2. Nicholas II in the Historical Memory of the Kuban Cossacks by O.V. Matveev. Translated by William Lee

3. The Wardrobe of the Imperial Family: The History of the Alexander Palace Collection by A.S. Rognatev. Translated by William Lee

4. Investigator Sokolov: “The Tsar’s Suffering Is Russia’s Suffering” by Y.Y. Vorobyevsky. Translated by Elizabeth S. Yellen

5. Novonikolayevsk: Born of the People’s Ambition and the Tsar’s Beneficence, Emperor Nicholas II and the City of Novosibirsk: Parallels Between Past and Present by E. Tsybizov. Translated by Elizabeth S. Yellen

6. Memorandum to Tsar Nicholas II by Pyotr Durnovo

7. My Mission to Clear the Name of Russia’s Last Tsar by Paul Gilbert

and Sovereign News – featuring news highlights from Russian media resources

***

SOVEREIGN No. 11 SPECIAL ‘ROYAL RUSSIA PAPERS’ 2019NOW IN STOCK!

Our ELEVENTH issue is dedicated to the ROYAL RUSSIA PAPERS. This SPECIAL ISSUE features 11 articles and many NEW photographs:

1. Russia’s Last Star: Nicholas II and Cinema by Viktor Belyakov;

2. Nicholas & Alexandra: A Love Affair in Letters by Vladimir Oustimenko;

3. The Imperial Family at Tobolsk by Paul Gilbert;

4. Nicholas II: A Re-evaluation of the Reign of Russia’s Last Tsar by Katie Danae Wilkens;

5. The Fall of the Romanovs by HRH Viktoria Luise Princess of Prussia;

6. Hostages to Political Games: Did Lenin Order the Execution of the Imperial Family? Interview with Vladimir Solviev by Viktor Kozhemyako;

7. ‘An Energetic and Chivalrous Protector’ – Danish Efforts to Help the Imprisoned Romanovs by Coryne Hall;

8. Servant to Three Emperors: Count Vladimir Frederiks by Margarita Nelipa;

9. ‘A True Friend of Russia’ – Russia’s Relations with Siam by Coryne Hall;

10. ‘My wonderful house on the seashore’ – A History of the Lower Dacha at Peterhof by Valentina Tenikhina;

11. Faithful to the End: The Devoted Retainers of the Imperial Family by Natalya Stukova; 

Note: this issue features many new photos which were not featured in the original articles, published in issues of Royal Russia, published between 2011 and 2017.

Launched in 2015, a total of 12 will be in print by the end of this year, including 3 Special Issues. Click HERE For more information on our journal Sovereign: The Life and Reign of Emperor Nicholas II

© Paul Gilbert. 30 January 2019